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Wild Life Tour with Ranthambore National Park

Ranthambore Ranthambhore National Park is one of the largest and most famous national parks in northern India. It is situated in Sawai Madhopur district of southeastern Rajasthan. The forests around the Ranthambore Fort were once, the private hunting grounds of the Maharajas of Jaipur. The entry point to the Park, goes straight to the foot of the fort and the forest rest house, Jogi Mahal. The latter boasts of the second-largest banyan tree in India. The Padam Talab, the Raj Bagh Talab and the Malik Talab are some of the lakes in the area, that attract the tiger population. They have been spotted at the edges of these lakes, and Jogi Mahal itself. Old crumbling walls, ruined pavilions, wells, and other ancient structures stand witness to the region's glorious past. The entire forest is peppered with the battlements and spillovers of the Ranthambore Fort - tigers are said to frequent these ruins, too. As a result of stringent efforts in conservation, tigers, the prime assets of the Park, have become more and more active during the day. More than in any other park or sanctuary in India, tigers are easily spotted here in daylight. They can be seen lolling around lazily in the sun, or feverishly hunting down Sambar around the lakes.

Sun IconGeography

Its total area is 275 km² core area & 392 km² including buffer zone and altitude: 215 to 505 meters above sea level. The Tiger Reserve area is 1334 km².The park lies at the edge of a plateau, and is bounded to the north by the Banas River and to the south by the Chambal River. There are several lakes in the park. It is named for the historic Ranthambhore fortress, which lies within the national park. The park covers an area of 392 km², and is known for its tiger population, and is one of India's Project Tiger reserves.


Sun IconFauna
Mammals
Mammals
Beside Tiger, the major wild animals that can be spotted in Ranthambore National Park are Leopard,Nilgai, dhole,Sambar, Chital, Striped Hyenas, Sambar deer, Common or Hanuman langurs, Macaques, Jackals, Jungle cats, Caracals, Sloth bears, Black bucks, Rufoustailed Hare, Indian Wild Boar, Chinkara, Common Palm Civets or Toddy cat, Coomon Yellow Bats, Desert Cats, Fivestriped Palm Squirels, Indian False Vampires, Indian Flying Foxes, Indian Foxes, Indian Gerbilles, Indian Mole Rats, Indian Porcupines, Longeared Hedgehogs, Ratels, Small Indian Mongoose, Small Indian Civets and Common mongoose.

Birds
Birds The reserve has thriving bird population with more than 270 different species of birds here are few of them: Graylag Goose, Woodpeckers, Indian Gray Hornbills, Common Kingfishers, Bee Eaters, Cuckoos, Parakeets, Asian Palm Swift, Owl, Nightjars, Pigeon, Dove, Crakes, Snipes, Sandpipers, Gulls, Terns, Great Crested Grebe, Eagles, Darters, Cormorants, Egrets, Herons, Bitterns, Flamingos, Ibis, Pelicans, Storks, Pittas, Shrikes, Treepies, Crows, Orioles, Cuckoo-Shrikes, Minivets, Drongos, Flycatchers, Ioras, Wood Shrikes, Pipits, Bayas, Sparrows, Finches, Wagtails, Munias, Bulbul, Mynas, Falcons etc.


Amphibians
The amphibian species only consist of the Common India Toad and the Common Frog,also North Indian Flap Shelled Turtles, Tortoise are seen.

Reptiles
Reptiles The park also has a large number of marsh crocs Reptiles: Snub Nosed Marsh Crocodiles, Desert Monitor Lizards, Banded Kraits, Cobras, Common Kraits, Ganga Soft Shelled Turtles, Indian Pythons, Rat Snakes, Russel's Vipers, Saw-scaled Vipers and the Indian Chamaeleon.

Sun IconFlora
Flora The terrain fluctuates between impregnable forests and open bushland. The forest is the typically dry deciduous type, with dhok, being the most prominent tree. It is also home to wide variety of trees, plants, Ranthambore is also the site for one of the largest Banyan trees in India.

Around 280 species of plants are found in the forest, mainly the forest area is covered by Aam (Magnifera iIndica), Imli (Tamarindicus indica), Babul (Accasia nilotica) , Banyan (Ficus benghalensis),Ber (Zizyphus mauritania), Dhak or Chila(flame of the forest/Butea monosperma), Dhok (Anogeossis pendula), Jamun (Syzygium cumini),Kadam (Authocephalus cadamba), Khajur (Phoenix sylvestris), Khair (Accacia catechu), Karel (Capparis decidua),Khejda (Prosopis specigera), Kakera (Flacourtia indica), Mohua (Madhuca indica), Neem (Azadirachta indica).

Sun IconHistory
Ranthambore
Ranthambhore was established as the Sawai Madhopur Game Sanctuary in 1955 by the Government of India, The Indian Government started Project Tiger in 1972 with an allotted area of 60 sq m. It was later expanded to become what is now called, the Ranthambore National Park. Ranthambore became a national park in 1980. In 1984, the adjacent forests were declared the Sawai Man Singh Sanctuary and Keladevi Sanctuary, and in 1991 the tiger reserve was enlarged to include Sawai Man Singh and Keladevi sanctuaries.

In 2005, there were 26 tigers living in Ranthambhore. This was significantly lower than the recorded tiger population of the reserve in 1982, which then stood at 44. In 2008, more than 14 tiger cubs were recorded. This was largely attributed to sustained efforts by forest officials to curb poaching. Villagers in the region were being given incentives to stay out of the park and surveillance cameras were also fitted across the reserve.

Request Note: The proposed tour can be customized as per your need and requirements.